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Thread: question on how they make this music

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    Marineking's Minion Reputation: 125

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    Default question on how they make this music



    Its an older style of the hard trance so im assuming from late 90s to early 2000s any ways how do they make those type of kick drums? I know of kick machine but is there any other way to make kicks like those with out a machine? if not how much a kick machince cost to get that style of kick sounds? i can do the bassline parts and i can get claps and snares and hi and low hats easly but want to make my own kicks that sound like this


    thank you guys

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    you want to make kick drum sounds without a machine? try a kick drum

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    Marineking's Minion Reputation: 125

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheSkald View Post
    you want to make kick drum sounds without a machine? try a kick drum
    i got a few kick packs on my pc. but they dont have that sound that is in that mix. ill try tweaking them some. add more bass. need to find a good distortion vst to go with it.

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    no duby i mean an actual physical kick drum. put a mic next to it and make yr own sounds

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    2 ways:
    a) Drumm samples, recorded of an analogue drum. (You can record your own lololol) They come on sampler CD's with a couple of hundred of drum sounds on them, you just cut one out and use it and filter/compress it and put effects on it as you please.
    b) Drum synts that produce a drum like sound. They often do not sound as good, but you can customise your sound into any direction you want. So it's more flexible, but often not as good and takes more knowledge. With a sampler you can just "surf" around until you find some stuff that works. With a synt, if you change your settings, when trying out stuff, you might never find your old settings again and it takes more experiance and it has a steeper learning curve.
    Drum synts can be standalone or be a plugin or come in both flavors. They also can be part of a dedicated microprocessor unit in a box, called a drum machine. Those are not as flexible as software, but possibly sound the worst.

    Also: look for tuts on youtube, like this or w/e (random grab)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JjbzB-Irj4s
    It doesn't matter that most of the tips on yt are kinda bad, just try pick up on the way what you like. That way you don't loose your creative edge.
    Last edited by Ronin; 07-22-2014 at 06:31 PM.

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    The kick used in the beginning of that track is really ordinary though.

    A kick like that is included in even the most basic drum sample library in a production tool like FL studio.
    If you really wanna make a kick sound as good as in a high-end production, you'll very rarely be able to do that with just a sample.

    90% is production work. Using things like a parametric EQ, adding a tiny bit of reverb(and I mean tiny), using ghost notes, and of course, making sure to balance it all out with your other tracks.
    Putting an emphasis on stereo-mixing, and for instance having several kicks layered on top of each other ensure a much more powerful and more pronounced sound.

    If you don't find anything that fits your need, give me a heads up, and I can mix out a couple of kicks for you that fits the style. I won't be able to do it on short notice though, because my schedule is pretty full atm.
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    Marineking's Minion Reputation: 125

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    Quote Originally Posted by hian View Post
    The kick used in the beginning of that track is really ordinary though.

    A kick like that is included in even the most basic drum sample library in a production tool like FL studio.
    If you really wanna make a kick sound as good as in a high-end production, you'll very rarely be able to do that with just a sample.

    90% is production work. Using things like a parametric EQ, adding a tiny bit of reverb(and I mean tiny), using ghost notes, and of course, making sure to balance it all out with your other tracks.
    Putting an emphasis on stereo-mixing, and for instance having several kicks layered on top of each other ensure a much more powerful and more pronounced sound.

    If you don't find anything that fits your need, give me a heads up, and I can mix out a couple of kicks for you that fits the style. I won't be able to do it on short notice though, because my schedule is pretty full atm.
    Thanks man. What do you mean ghost notes when you get the time please do explain. Aslo thanks for the offers for the kicks. I rather learn to produce my own but ill shoot you a pm if i cant learn to make them. Still learning the parametric EQ thing and have not really grasped it. On the reverb how much would you recamend. Right now on my kicks i got all are from small kick packs i have found years ago. If you by any chance know of any good free psytrance packs especially in the dark psy trance i would most appreciate it. As what i am aiming for is a psy style of hardtrance and a few dark psytrance every now and then. Thanks man

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    Ghost notes, are duplicate notes that are played with different parameters from the dominant note to make the sound more rich and natural, and therefore to avoid having the exact same sound loop over and over again.

    For instance, if you have a snare, then you copy that snare, change up the pan of the sound (maybe a tad more to the left speaker than the original), you have the copied snare play 0.1 sec later than the original, lower the volume, add some reverb etc.
    It's called a ghost note, I think, because you're not really supposed to hear it. It's just there in the background to add a miniscule additional layer of depth to something else, like your snare or kick, or whatever.

    Wiki says this on ghost notes for drums:
    In drumming, a ghost note is played at very low volume, and typically on a snare drum. In musical notation, ghost notes are indicated in parenthesis surrounding the note. According to The Drummer's Bible: How to Play Every Drum Style from Afro-Cuban to Zydeco, the purpose of a ghost note is to "...be heard under the main sound of the groove. This produces a subtle 16th-note feel around a strong back beat or certain accents."

    In production though, I generally think people use the term a bit differently, as in the way I used it above.

    As for your kick and reverb - it depends a lot on what kind of sound you're going for.
    I don't usually like to have reverb on it to the point that you actually notice it.
    Depends on what plugins you're working with to.
    The reverb plugin I use, if I wanna blend my kick in better with the synth etc. I'll go to the main reverb control, and have it set to 3(out of 100) or something.

    I can't say I know of any good packs. You'll just have to google that stuff a whole lot. Some electronic music communities are really nice about sharing elements and VSTs, and some aren't. Really depends on how community based, and how hippie-like the followers of that kinda music are =P
    Last edited by hian; 07-24-2014 at 09:36 AM.
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    Thank you hian for explaining that. ill practice a little today and see if i can get something simple made

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    Quote Originally Posted by hian View Post
    Ghost notes, are duplicate notes that are played with different parameters from the dominant note to make the sound more rich and natural, and therefore to avoid having the exact same sound loop over and over again.

    For instance, if you have a snare, then you copy that snare, change up the pan of the sound (maybe a tad more to the left speaker than the original), you have the copied snare play 0.1 sec later than the original, lower the volume, add some reverb etc.
    It's called a ghost note, I think, because you're not really supposed to hear it. It's just there in the background to add a miniscule additional layer of depth to something else, like your snare or kick, or whatever.

    Wiki says this on ghost notes for drums:
    In drumming, a ghost note is played at very low volume, and typically on a snare drum. In musical notation, ghost notes are indicated in parenthesis surrounding the note. According to The Drummer's Bible: How to Play Every Drum Style from Afro-Cuban to Zydeco, the purpose of a ghost note is to "...be heard under the main sound of the groove. This produces a subtle 16th-note feel around a strong back beat or certain accents."

    In production though, I generally think people use the term a bit differently, as in the way I used it above.

    As for your kick and reverb - it depends a lot on what kind of sound you're going for.
    I don't usually like to have reverb on it to the point that you actually notice it.
    Depends on what plugins you're working with to.
    The reverb plugin I use, if I wanna blend my kick in better with the synth etc. I'll go to the main reverb control, and have it set to 3(out of 100) or something.

    I can't say I know of any good packs. You'll just have to google that stuff a whole lot. Some electronic music communities are really nice about sharing elements and VSTs, and some aren't. Really depends on how community based, and how hippie-like the followers of that kinda music are =P

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    lol, yeah, sorry for all the "technical" terms. I usually don't like to do that, and make sure whatever I'm talking about is accessible as possible to lay-people, but when it comes to music production many of the local terms will pop up consistently in whatever software it is that you're using, so it's best to just get used to it. It also makes it easier to google if you need answers to specifics.

    In FL studio, a lot of the plugins have these original, nonsensical terms and that makes it hard for people in the community to communicate consistently about production. A good example is a plugin called "soundgoodizer" which is essentially just this plugin you can use on a sample, or melody-line, that mixes the sound to make it "sound better".
    It has a couple of easy pre-set options, and a knob you can turn to effect the amount of change you want. What it actually does is just lower certain frequencies of a track, and increase others.
    So, for instance, if you have a track with a drum loop, some strings and a bass, using the soundgoodizer might increase the sound of the drums, decrease the sound of the strings, and it also might have some effect on the stereo-effect of the track.
    It saves you the trouble of having to sit down with an EQ and customize the sound frequencies of a track, by going with pre-sets that are commonly considered to be the best or most apt for a certain sound.

    However, if you go to a forum where people don't use FL studio and start talking about "soundgoozing" your track, nobody is going to understand what you're talking about at all =S

    Also doesn't help that the music production community has a lot of people in it, who're self-taught and don't have any formal education on production(like me), who'll use original vocabulary to describe their process because their process of learning was really organic, and not based on a streamlined, common practice of production in the industry.

    Chances are, people who know more about production than me, who has an education in it, are going to look at my posts in this thread and go "wtf is this guy going on about, this is all wrong".
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